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Modern Netherlands

Gallery: Churches of Gelderland

by Peter Kessler, 21 February 2010

 

 

Heumen Part 1: Churches of Heilig Land Stichting & Heumen

Cenakelkerk

Cenakelkerk is located at the end of Monseigneur Suyslaan, in the region called the Holy Land Foundation (Heilig Land Stichting), on the south-eastern border of Nijmegen. The church is also known as St Anthonius van Padua. The Foundation was created in 1911 by a priest named A Suys after a pilgrimage to Palestine. Land was acquired in the district of Groesbeek and a small village with a Byzantine-style church, monasteries and a biblical open air museum were built.

Cenakelkerk

Suys was assisted by fellow participant in the pilgrimage, Jan Stuyt, who provided the design. In 1932-1936 a second church was built (architect unknown), which was never completely finished. The church is centralised, with a dome of reinforced concrete on top, one of the first of that size in the Netherlands. Arranged around the central space are chapels, and the choir has a semi-circular apse. The interior is highly colourful, in contrast to the white exterior.

Protestant Congregation Church of Heumen

The Protestant Congregation Church of Heumen (Protestantse Gemeente Heumen) is on Dorpstraat 19 in the town of Heumen, a few kilometres directly south of Nijmegen on the border between the provinces of Gelderland and North Brabant. This is the 'old church' in Heumen's village square. A chapel here was first mentioned in 1200, which is when the tower was built. In 1500, the Romanesque choir (at the rear) was replaced by one which was higher, in the Gothic style.

Protestant Congregation Church of Heumen

Dedicated to St George, it became a reformed church in the sixteenth century. The section of the church adjacent to the tower was used by the civil authorities in the nineteenth century, and they built two jail cells into it. The most recent restoration work took place in 1976-1977 when the main entrance was switched back to its original home at the foot of the tower. Alongside the door is a glazed terracotta relief of the Battle of Mookerheyde (1574), made in 1939.

St George's Church Heumen

St George's Church Heumen (St Georgius Kerk) is on Dorpstraat 34, opposite the old church. When the Catholic religion was allowed again, the Catholics were promised their old church back, provided they built a new church for the Protestants. Once this was done, it was remarked that the old Catholic church was too small for the bigger Catholic population, which then decided to keep the new bigger building and left the old church to the Protestant population.

St George's Church Heumen

The first St George's Church was probably a temporary building. It was put up in 1841 by the Roman Catholic public works engineers, and in 1884 it was replaced by a second, probably more permanent, church. This was largely destroyed on 9 September 1944, during the Allied advance towards Germany. The present church, the third on the site, was built in 1952 as a kind of neo-basilica to a design by architect E Nijsten. It was consecrated in June 1955.

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