History Files
 

 

Northeast Asia

Chronology of the Three Kingdoms

Compiled by Peter Kessler, 1 April 1999

 

 

57 BC - AD 676

This age marks a contentious period of Korean history in which various states fought between themselves and the Han Chinese for control of East Asia.

Omitted here is the history of Kaya (AD 42-562), which would more correctly make the period "The Four Kingdoms", but its present title has long been in common use.

 

Formation of various states: Puyo, Chinhan , Mahan, Pyonhan, Okcho, Tongye, etc.
 

Start of the Three Kingdoms Period.

57 BC

Founding of Silla.
 

37 BC

Founding of Koguryo.
 

 

 

18 BC

Founding of Paekche.
 

AD 42

Founding of Kaya.
 

49

First record of contact between Puyo and China.
 

244

Wei invasion of Koguryo.
 

246

Paekche take-over of Liaoxi.
 

342

Invasion of Koguryo by Murong-huang of Xianbi.
 

369

Paekche eliminated Mahan.
 

371

Paekche invasion of Koguryo; Koguryo's king Koguk-won killed.
 

372

Koguryo acceptance of Buddhism.
 

384

Paekche importation of Buddhism.
 

391 - 409

Reign of King Kwanggaet'o.
 

433

Paekche-Silla military alliance formed.
 

475

Major Koguryo invasion of Paekche; Paekche moves capital to Ung-jin (present Kongju).
 

520

Major institutional reforms by Silla's king Pp-heung.
 

532

Silla annexation of Great Kaya (Tae Kaya).
 

538

Song-wang moves Paekche capital to Sabi (present Puyo).
 

551

Silla breaks pact with Paekche. Takes over Han river area. Paekche's Sng-wang killed in battle.
 

562

Complete Silla annexation of Kaya.
 

612

Major Sui invasion o f Koguryo; crushed by Ulchi- mundok and Koguryo army at Sal-su.
 

642

Invasion by Taizong of Tang against Koguryo; routed at Ansi fortress.
 

654

Death of Yonkae- somun.
 

660

Silla-Tang allied forces conquer Paekche.
 

663

Defeat of the Paekche restoration movement.
 

668

Fall of Koguryo to Silla-Tang army.
 

671

Silla drives out Tang army stationed in old Paekche territory.
 

676

Silla defeats Tang near Mae-cho fortress, complete hegemony over much of the peninsula (present Yong-in).

 

 

 

     
Text copyright P L Kessler. An original feature for the History Files.