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Modern Britain

Gallery: Churches of South-East London

by Peter Kessler, 2 February 2009. Updated 22 July 2019

Southwark Part 1: Churches of Bermondsey & East Dulwich

St Mary Magdalen Bermondsey

St Mary Magdalen Bermondsey is on the eastern side of Bermondsey Street, midway between Abbey Street to the south and Newham's Row to the north. It originally formed part of Bermondsey Abbey which was founded in the eighth century and was attached to Cluny Abbey in France. A new building was in use in 1089. While the oldest part of the present building is the tower, parts of which date from around 1290, most of the building dates from around 1680.

St John's Church, East Dulwich Grove

St John the Evangelist East Dulwich is a Victorian Gothic church which lies on the north-western corner of East Dulwich Road and Adys Road, on the northern side of the common. This area on the border between Dulwich and Peckham was built up from fields in the mid-nineteenth century, largely due to the coming of the railways, which made it ideal commuter territory. The church was completed in 1865 to a design by architect Charles Barry, nephew of the local landowner.

St John's Church, East Dulwich Grove

It replaced an earlier chapel in East Dulwich which had been erected by the landowner in 1826 on Lordship Lane, which lies immediately south of East Dulwich Road. St John's was badly damaged by bombing in 1940, and remained out of use until it was rededicated by the bishop of Southwark in 1951. The original spire shown here was replaced by a new red tile spire in the same style in 2005, and an extension was added in 1996 which is now a community centre.

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