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Modern Britain

Gallery: Churches of Anglesey

by Peter Kessler, 24 June 2020

Anglesey Part 1: Churches of Menai Bridge, Beaumaris & Holyhead

English Presbyterian Church, Menai Bridge, Anglesey, Wales

The English Presbyterian Church, Menai Bridge, is on the eastern side of Bridge Street and is clearly visible from Chapel Street close to its southern flank. Preaching in English first started in the New Hall in 1867. In 1882-1883 the site for new premises was secured and this chapel was built in 1888. The Decorated Gothic building is laid out in a cruciform plan, with a lower storey housing the vestry, schoolroom, and so on. The tower and spire incorporates the entrance.

Church of St Mary & St Nicholas, Beaumaris, Anglesey, Wales

The Church of St Mary & St Nicholas, Beaumaris, occupies grounds between Church Street (east) and Steeple Lane (west). It was founded about 1330 to serve the new town here. It retains an original decorated nave, with four-bay arcades. The chancel was rebuilt around 1500 in Perpendicular style. The four stage west tower has a battlemented parapet. The upper section was remodelled in the early 1800s, and the north vestry and south porch added.

Capel Seion, Beaumaris, Anglesey, Wales

Capel Seion is at the south-west corner of Steeple Lane and Chapel Street. The first Capel Seion was built in 1784, the earliest nonconformist foundation here. It was smaller and orientated differently, but a larger building was clearly needed. The present Italianate chapel of scribed roughcast painted yellow-brown was standing by 1889 and remained in service for about a century. It closed at the end of the 1900s and has since been converted into a private residence.

St Cybi's Church, Holyhead, Anglesey, Wales

St Cybi's Church, Holyhead, is on the west side of Victoria Road, around seventy metres south of the junction with Swift Square. A church was traditionally founded here by St Cybi within the walls of a late Roman fort. The present building dates mainly from the late 1400s and/or early 1500s. The chancel incorporates masonry of the previous structure (1200s). Restoration was carried out in 1877-1879 by Sir Gilbert Scott. The Stanley chapel dates to 1896-1897.

All photos on this page kindly contributed by Elliott Brown, via the 'History Files: Churches of the British Isles' Flickr group. Additional information by Elliot Brown.

 

 

     
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