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Modern Britain

Gallery: Churches of Norfolk

by Peter Kessler, 3 May 2019

North Norfolk Part 2: Churches of Bacton and Edingthorpe

Beacon Community Church, Bacton

Beacon Community Church, Bacton, is on the southern side of Walcott Road, opposite Sea View Estate road. The Beacon is a young church that was formed in March 2009. Its members are fortunate in being able to use the premises of the former Bacton Particular Baptist Church that met on the current site for many years. This was founded in 1821 or 1822 and had a unique feature - a stained glass window in memory of George Pilgrim who was pastor for fifty-six years.

St Andrew, Bacton

St Andrew's Church, Bacton, sits to the north of Church Lane, almost in a direct line from the northern end of Sandy Lane. The present building is late fifteenth century, or thereabouts. It replaced an older building, possibly of stone, of which one Ralph was vicar in 1257. The church was granted to the prior of Bromholm by William de Glanville, its founder. The four stage tower - impressive thanks to substantial bequests - contains a ring of six bells.

All Saints, Edingthorpe

All Saints, Edingthorpe is on Church Lane, to the north of Rectory Road and the straggly hamlet of Edingthorpe itself. It sits on a rise surrounded by open fields, with only one or two farm buildings visible around it. The walls are flint, the earliest parts being either late Saxon or early Norman, placing the initial construction in the eleventh century. Masonry was added in the twelfth century and the height of the walls was increased in the fourteenth for new windows.

All Saints, Edingthorpe

The tower is round at the base and for over half its length - eleventh century in terms of dating - while the top section is late medieval and is octagonal in shape. Inside the church, on the wall, hangs the 'Paston door', the original twelfth century north door of the church. On the north wall is a sequence of wall paintings, probably from the late fourteenth century. The plastered walls boast a series of medieval wall paintings, probably also from the fourteenth century.

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