History Files
 

 

Celtic Kingdoms of the British Isles

Celts of Cymru

 

 

 

Map Dunoding

FeatureDunoding was another of the sub-kingdoms of Gwynedd, this one being situated in the Porthmadog and Harlech region of western Gwynedd. Upon the death of Cunedda Wledig, his fourth son, Dynod, gained this territory, which was named after him.

(Additional information by Edward Dawson.)

c.445

Dynod ap Cunedag

c.475

Einion ap Dynod

c.500

Dingad ap Einion

c.530

Meurig ap Dingad

c.560

Einion ap Meurig

c.590

Isaag ap Einion

c.620

Podgen Hen (the Old) ap Isaag

c.650

Poedlew ap Podgen

c.680

Iddon ap Poedlew

c.710

Brochfael ap Idon

Possibly named after the better known Brochfael Ysgythrog of sixth century Powys, the name is an intriguing one. The second part of it is the familiar 'fael', which can also be shown as 'mael' in other variations and 'maglo' going further back in time. It means servant, slave, follower, etc. The first part is rather more puzzling. 'Broch' seems to derive from proto-Celtic 'broko', meaning 'anger', which also means 'badger' ('angry animal'). It still means both in modern Welsh, but its origins as a name are unknown. Was there some (local) deity who was a personification of anger? Or was there some family emblem from tribal days, a badger totem perhaps? Its re-use in seventh century Meirionydd and eighth century Dunoding suggests that it had been popularised to an extent by the earlier Powysian king.

c.740

Eigion ap Brochfael

c.770

Iouanwal ap Eigion

c.800

Caradog ap Iouanwal

c.830

Bleidudd ap Caradog

c.860

Cuhelm ap Bleidudd

c.850 - c.925

The line of descent from Dynod apparently ends with Cuhelm, so the territory is fully merged back into Gwynedd.